Phytotherapy for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.). Public domain photo from Pikist.com.

Azin and Khazali (2021) of Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran, carried out a literature review of studies concerning the potential role of herbs in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a frequently encountered female complaint.

The 31 studies reviewed collectively covered 25 different herbs, two Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and one Ayurvedic formulae, and four isolates from herbs (berberine, curcumin, soy isoflavone and quercetin).

Of the 25 herbs in the studies, 9 are native to the area of interest of this blog, the Mediterranean and Near East: aloe vera (Aloe
barbadensis
), anise (Pimpinella anisum), fennel (Foeniculum
vulgare
), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum), flax seed (Linum usitatissimum), hazelnut (Corylus avellana), liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), nettle and pomegranate (Punica granatum).

Of the studies done with these herbs, three were done with human subjects, the other with animal models. Two were done with women with PCOS. Some of the studies showed clinical benefits for PCOS, others showed improved hormone profiles consistent with better potential PCOS outcomes, others still improved secondary complications of PCOS such as metabolic syndrome.

The table below summarises in very basic form some data from the review.

HerbClinical benefits for PCOSImproved hormone profileImproved complications of PCOSHuman/
Animal
Aloe vera**A
Anise**A
Fennel*A
Fenugreek**H
Flax seed**H
Hazlenut**A
Liquorice**A, H
Nettle*A
Pomegranate**A
Citation:

Azin F. & Khazali H. (2021). Phytotherapy of polycystic ovary syndrome: A review. International Journal of Reproductive BioMedicine Volume 20, Issue no. 1, https://doi.org/10.18502/ijrm.v20i1.10404

Antidiabetic Herbs: A Review

Fenugreek flower (Trigonella foenum-graecum – L.). One of the plants discussed in this review, for which there is scientific evidence indicating antidiabetic effects. Public domain photo from Pxfuel.com.

This open access 2018 review by Paolo Governa and co-workers from the University of Siena and the Italian Society of Phytotherapy provides an overview of the use of medicinal plants in the management of diabetes, with particular regard to evidence of clinical effectiveness of medicinal plants in controlling diabetes-related symptoms.

The authors emphasise the following species enlisted in WHO monographs with indication of use for diabetes:

  • Holy basil, Ocimum tenuiflorum L., leaves.
  • Fenugreek, Trigonella foenum-graecum L., seeds.
  • Onion, Allium cepa L., bulb.
  • Neem, Azadirachta indica A. Juss., leaves.
  • Bitter melon, Momordica charantia L., fruit.
  • Korean ginseng, Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, roots.
  • American ginseng, Panax quinquefolius L., roots.
  • Rehmannia glutinosa (Gaertn.) DC., roots.

Many of these are used of diabetes in traditional medical systems or described in pharmacopoeias for this use. The authors consider that for the first two, holy basil and fenugreek, their use in diabetes is supported by clinical data.

The authors also discuss some other species which are attracting the interest of the scientific community for their promise in treating diabetes.

The authors comment that there is a crucial need for stronger evidence-based data.

Citation

Governa P, Baini G, Borgonetti V, Cettolin G, Giachetti D, Magnano AR, Miraldi E, Biagi M. Phytotherapy in the Management of Diabetes: A Review. Molecules. 2018; 23(1):105. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23010105